Help me fund my way back “Home” to the Borderlands

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Community Update from Michoacán

This is Alex Reporting from Morelia, Michoacán. A Region in which Resistance against the bad government, corruption, and organized crime is real.

Early December 2013, I left the Unites States in the hopes of reuniting with my loved ones and family I have not seen in years due to my Immigration Status.

 

My Homes

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It was something surreal I could  never be able to explain.After 10 years I  returned to Guadalajara, Jalisco to see my grandmother, which was pretty ill at the time. I was able to take care of her and help around for a few weeks in and out the hospital.

After that I went to see my brother: He left the US with the frustrations of not being able to access higher education and terrorized by fear of working and being deported, relocated to DF to become a better man. Some of my work began then, at home, working on his case in the hopes we could bring him back home to the US and see his son Aiden,whom we haven’t heard of in 5 years and left to Juneau, Alaska.

The thought of migrating back and forth from my different homes re-routed my purpose to the heart, in which no other policy could negotiate my process of healing and medicine. I am glad, as a grown adult, I was able to re-learn my origins and listen to the truths of my elders, sisters and brothers.

 Migrating then became my process of healing, without fear of what’s to come next.

 

Escuelita Zapatista

Based on my autonomous process of learning on community, one of my dreams when I lived in Mexico as a young Jotita, was to learn from los Zapatistas.

Before I left the Bay Area, I received knowledge I had been accepted to be a part of the Escuelita Zapatista (The Little Zapatista School), a five day training held by the revolutionary indigenous group, Ejercito Zapatista de Liberacion Nacional (Zapatista Army of National Liberation) based out of Chiapas, Mexico. This was another sign my journey had just begun and I cannot tell you how much joy that filled my spirit.

I attended its second round, celebrating it’s 20th anniversary of their uprising in 1994 from the Mexican government En La Madre de todos los Caracoles, El Caracol de La Realidad.

As I redefine my purpose and consciousness as a growing Jota, the beauty and humility they shared with me was definitely a life-changing experience I will carry with me as a semilla in the work that I’m committed to do with our future ancestors.

 

Bring Them Home Round 3

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Part of my awakening as an organizer, was to not only devote my efforts on policy or advocacy to our queer immigrant familia up north in the US, but to also  find the courage to look down south and learn/work with previously deported migrant Joteria and families in the homeland.

I decided to join the National Immigrant Youth Alliance, self-deporting as an organizer in Mexico, to coordinate the 3rd action, which hopes to reunite not only dreamers, but also families from Central America, South America, and members of our queer familia to the United States. That’s about 250 families, including myself coming back.

I am currently working with our film coordinator documenting the experiences of all these families, from the Rivera Maya in Chiapas and Guatemala, all the way up through the states of Veracruz, Oaxaca, Quintana Roo, Jalisco, Michoacán, Ciudad de Mexico, Tamaulipas, Guanajuato, Monterrey, Sinaloa, Coahuila, Sonora, Baja California, Aguascalientes, Nuevo Leon entre otros.

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HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT

 

That’s where I ask for your support. Until today, I have funded most of these expenses on my own, hoping that would be enough, transportation on traveling to every single family has lowered my funds for which I ask kindly to help me get back to the border in Tijuana on March 1st so I could participate in this action.

Families have opened their homes and tables warmly. Thankfully I have not been out of food or housing. However, If you can help me raise 800$, I will be able to pay for my transportation around the Mexican states I need to attend and my flight back to Tijuana.

Other expenses your kind donation will cover: Paying for previous tickets on my first civil disobedience (Being problematic gets expensive) against deportations, Birth Certificate, Mexican Passport (both expired) Legal Documents, Gas and Emergency food, as well as the cheap as phone I have to communicate with all the participants in land, which is very needed right now.

You can help contribute  anything from 5$, 10$, or 20$. Anything is welcomed and we can make it happen collectively.




PayPal account is not required and anyone can donate using any major credit card.

 

 

More on NIYA’s “Bring them Home Campaign”

We believe in the power of this campaign because it sends a clear message to ICE on deportations; anyone you deport has the potential to end up on America’s doorstep, asking for permission to come home. It sends the message that deportations need to stop, and as a bonus we help families come home!

Our first round of this campaign took us to Nogales, Arizona; there we helped 9 Dreamers come home. More importantly we were able to show that, even a deportation to another country doesn’t mean hope is lost. For Round 2 we found ourselves in Laredo, Texas in which we reunited 23 families, and now we’ll be heading over to San Diego, California. We know there are a great many friends and allies in California; so we think it’ll be the perfect place to bring the message of coming home.

We firmly believe all 2.1 million people deported deserve to come home.

Here are some of the findings on our successful campaign:

http://theniya.org/niyas-response-congressional-hearing-asylum-fraud-abusing-americas-compassion/

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I know this work is greater that myself, and even though I’m not guaranteed my return, I understand this work is necessary and I hope you can support all of us just the same.
Para un mundo donde quepan muchos mundos,

 

Con amor, hasta la victoria y  siempre,

 

Alex


A PayPal account is not required and anyone can donate using any major credit card.

 

 

More on NIYA’s “Bring them Home Campaign”

We believe in the power of this campaign because it sends a clear message to ICE on deportations; anyone you deport has the potential to end up on America’s doorstep, asking for permission to come home. It sends the message that deportations need to stop, and as a bonus we help families come home!

Our first round of this campaign took us to Nogales, Arizona; there we helped 9 Dreamers come home. More importantly we were able to show that, even a deportation to another country doesn’t mean hope is lost. For Round 2 we found ourselves in Laredo, Texas in which we reunited 23 families, and now we’ll be heading over to San Diego, California. We know there are a great many friends and allies in California; so we think it’ll be the perfect place to bring the message of coming home.

We firmly believe all 2.1 million people deported deserve to come home.

Here are some of the findings on our successful campaign:

http://theniya.org/niyas-response-congressional-hearing-asylum-fraud-abusing-americas-compassion/

***************

IMG_3727

I know this work is greater that myself, and even though I’m not guaranteed my return, I understand this work is necessary and I hope you can support all of us just the same.
Para un mundo donde quepan muchos mundos,

 

Con amor, hasta la victoria y  siempre,

 

Alex

Alejandro

Alex Aldana is queer undocumented immigrant rights activist that works as a national/community organizer with a vibrant and very raw/uncensored opinion in the myriad of intersectionalities that impact the Immigrant Youth Movement (DREAMers) and brings strategy and direct action to create a new dialogue & truly bring social justice and equality within the LGBTQ/Immigrant movement. Alex migrated from Guadalajara,Mexico to the United States when he was 16 in 2003 to the beautiful dunes of the Coachella Valley. Greaduated from La Quinta high School in 2005 and not having the stability most middle families have, and experiencing dometic violence in the household,he went on with life and decided to support his mother and sister to work in the farm fields picking grapes and embracing the soil and the culture of the farm worker, construction work, and other opportunities that would help them survive. Alex’s only higher education has been deep-rooted by and for the community: Impacted by the scarce resources in the Coachella valley, he decided to get involved as health advocate for Latino LGBTQ youth, doing HIV/AIDS prevention, education and treatment through social justice, advocacy and empowerment to immigrant communities impacted and oppressed in Southern California. Alex worked as an HIV Counselor, Case Manager and Queer mentor with Bienestar Human Services providing services to Latino LGBTQ youth in Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernardino County since 2007. At a local, state and national level , he has contributed with conferences and rallies addressing LGBTQ issues in school districts (Queer Youth Advocacy Day 2008) , marriage equality (Prop 8 campaign), Immigrant rights (May Day March 2010 Queer youth contingent) and representing HIV services for undocumented immigrants at The United States Conference on AIDS in 2011.His devoted contribution at a local level in his community was to create the first lgbtq latino group in the Coachella Valley in 2011. Aldana’s liberation by “Coming out of the shadows” was followed by an action in San Bernardino, CA in 2012 along with the Immigrant Youth Coalition, Where he was arrested protesting against “secure communities/287g” outside of city hall to empower immigrant communities that live in fear because such laws. After coming out publicly with his immigration status he joined the Campaign for an American DREAM, a walking across the country from San Francisco to DC where 5 undocumented students empowered communitites & pushed to stop the massive deportations of DREAM act elegible youth and families President Obama executed and separated in his term. He also organized the hunger strike and occupation at the Obama for America office in Denver,CO on June of the same year, asking for an executive order which replicated across the country and put pressure to issue the Deffered Action for Childhood arrivals a week after the mobilization. Recent work in Albuquerque, NM included organizing the first national encuentro for The Association of Joteria,Arts,Activism and Scholarship (AJAAS) mobilizing undocumented queer youth from the border states of California, Arizona, and Texas. He will continue to address human rights violations and justice with the intersections of his work on HIV prevention, LGBTQ issues, Education, and Immigration along with radical activist groups that cannot and will no longer remain dormant in the shadows.

One thought on “Help me fund my way back “Home” to the Borderlands

  • March 13, 2014 at 9:35 pm
    Permalink

    Hello Alex, I also grew up in the states and have been in Mexico for a little over two years now. I have been watching the news and heard about what the organization is doing for many people like me. I live in Tijuana and would more information on the organization and how I can be a part of those hopeful dreamers that are trying to get back to their families.

    Reply

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